Photo-technique [Individual Subject section]07 Taking Photographs from a Different Viewpoint06 Beautiful sky photography05 Enjoy photography on a golf course04 Taking pictures of dishes so that they look delicious, Part 203 Taking snapshots on streets02 Taking pictures of dishes so that they look delicious, Part 101 World Heritage sites photographed in a fantastic atmosphere
Photo-technique [Individual Subject section] 03 Taking snapshots on streets while exploring a city

Advanced technique 2

Waiting for passersby at a location where you want to add an eye-catcher!

When you take a picture of a subject that you are interested in while you are strolling along a street, you may find the photo disappointing because there is something missing. In such a case, try adding an eye-catcher in the photo by including passersby. It will add a sense of warmth, depth, and breadth to the picture.


Sample photo: Door-1.JPG
Taken with: GR DIGITAL II ●1/500 sec ●F5.6 ●ISO100 ●EV-0.3 ●WB:AUTO
Sample photo: Door-2.JPG
Taken with: GR DIGITAL II ●1/400 sec ●F5.0 ●ISO100 ●EV-0.3 ●WB:AUTO
Sample photo: A.JPG
Taken with: GR DIGITAL II ●1/800 sec ●F8.0 ●ISO100 ●EV-0.3 ●WB:AUTO
I found a beautiful shadow of a traffic light cast on a white wall along the sidewalk when I crossed a crossing. I placed the scenery in the camera frame appropriately, which resulted in a high-quality photograph with a well-balanced composition.
Sample photo: B.JPG
Taken with: GR DIGITAL II ●1/800 sec ●F8.0 ●ISO100 ●EV-0.3 ●WB:AUTO
I was satisfied with the photo and about to leave the location. But I changed my mind and decided to add another element in the picture and waited for a passerby to enter the frame. By including a passerby in it, a snapshot with a cool appearance became a warm picture.
Sample photo: C.JPG
Taken with: GR DIGITAL II ●1/640 sec ●F6.3 ●ISO100 ●EV-0.3 ●WB:AUTO
I found a brightly colored winter camellia appearing through a crack in an old plastered wall. I felt it was in beautiful harmony with the small path along the wall, and photographed it using macro mode.
Sample photo: E.JPG
Taken with: GR DIGITAL II ●1/500 sec ●F6.3 ●ISO100 ●EV-0.3 ●WB:AUTO
In addition, I waited until a woman who was coming home from shopping entered the house, and released the shutter to include the walking couple into the picture. However, the couple had already gone down the path, resulting in a picture with both the camellia and the couple looking less impressive than I had hoped. It is important to include passersby in a picture at the right moment.
Sample photo: D.JPG
Taken with: GR DIGITAL II ●1/500 sec ●F6.3 ●ISO100 ●EV-0.3 ●WB:AUTO
Immediately after I photographed the flower, I found that a couple was passing by. When I switched back from macro mode, included the couple in the frame, and pressed the shutter, a woman coming back from shopping was walking behind the couple and was also included in the picture - something I did not want. However, I accepted it as a lucky coincidental event. This photo came out best in terms of a photo opportunity.
Sample photo: F.JPG
Taken with: GR DIGITAL II ●1/500 sec ●F6.3 ●ISO100 ●EV-0.3 ●WB:AUTO
I thought that the long shadow of the electric power lines was cast beautifully on the sidewalk, so I released the shutter while holding the camera vertically. However, I felt that the shot looked boring, and decided to wait for passersby.
Sample photo: G.JPG
Taken with: GR DIGITAL II ●1/500 sec ●F5.6 ●ISO100 ●EV-0.3 ●WB:AUTO
A few minutes later, a woman with a baby buggy was coming along. I waited until she came to the spot that I thought was a good shooting location, and pressed the shutter. It is also a common practice in street photography to visualize the finished photo with people while patiently waiting for passersby.



Utilizing color and monochrome with the aspect ratio of 1:1!

An aspect ratio setting of 1:1 is provided only by a medium 6 x 6 format camera. Use this setting to create a picture with a square format. You do not need to think about the orientation of the camera, therefore, you don't need to waste any time pointing the camera at a subject. In addition, we will try out a new type of photographic expression by switching between color and monochrome modes, which is only possible with a digital camera.


Sample photo: Door-1.JPG
Taken with: GR DIGITAL II ●1/800 sec ●F7.1 ●ISO100 ●EV-0.3 ●WB:AUTO
Sample photo: Door-2.JPG
Taken with: GR DIGITAL II ●1/400 sec ●F5.0 ●ISO100 ●EV-0.3 ●WB:AUTO
Sample photo: Door-3.JPG
Taken with: GR DIGITAL II ●1/320 sec ●F7.1 ●ISO100 ●EV-0.0 ●WB:AUTO
Sample photo: Door-4.JPG
Taken with: GR DIGITAL II ●1/640 sec ●F7.0 ●ISO100 ●EV-0.3 ●WB:AUTO
Sample photo: A.JPG
Taken with: GR DIGITAL II ●1/500 sec ●F5.6 ●ISO100 ●EV-0.3 ●WB:AUTO
The monochrome image setting with an aspect ratio of 1:1 is preset in My Setting 1 of GR DIGITAL II , and the color image setting with an aspect ratio of 1:1 in My Setting 2. You can instantly switch between the two modes depending on the subject you are shooting. The flamingoes taken using the color image setting came out beautifully.
Sample photo: B.JPG
Taken with: GR DIGITAL II ●1/500 sec ●F5.6 ●ISO100 ●EV-0.3 ●WB:AUTO
On the other hand, the flamingoes photographed in monochrome mode are shown with grey gradations, giving you the impression that you are looking at a quality photograph printed on baryta paper.
Sample photo: C.JPG
Taken with: GR DIGITAL II ●1/640 sec ●F7.1 ●ISO100 ●EV-0.0 ●WB:AUTO
The square size (aspect ratio: 1:1) format is commonly available with a 6 x 6 format camera. A picture taken in color mode in this format gives you the feeling of a hazy sky atmosphere during the flower season.
Sample photo: D.JPG
Taken with: GR DIGITAL II ●1/800 sec ●F7.1 ●ISO100 ●EV-0.3 ●WB:AUTO
The flavors of the color picture and the monochrome picture are different in spite of the fact that both photos were taken of the same scene. The picture in color gives you the feeling of a hazy sky atmosphere, and the monochrome picture portrays a crisp sense of serenity.
Sample photo: E.JPG
Taken with: GR DIGITAL II ●1/250 sec ●F7.1 ●ISO100 ●EV-0.0 ●WB:AUTO
The combination of the western style house with its brick-red color in a friendly atmosphere and the deep green color of the tree leaves is well composed in a frame of an aspect ratio of 1:1. The square format, for which the camera orientation is irrelevant, is a most beautiful form of photography.
Sample photo: F.JPG
Taken with: GR DIGITAL II ●1/500 sec ●F5.6 ●ISO100 ●EV-0.3 ●WB:AUTO
With a digital camera, color pictures can be convert into monochrome pictures afterward. However, even when using a digital camera, I use the monochrome setting mode from the beginning as if I am using a film camera loaded with black and white film. In this way, I can concentrate on finding shapes, without being bothered by colors.



Shooting a subject using the supreme snapping technique: deep focus plus no finder shot!

Pressing the shutter without looking into the LCD monitor or the finder is a technique called "no finder shot". Let's try photographing using the no finder shot technique and the deep focus setting. Use this ultimate street-shooting style to take pictures with uncalculated framing and spontaneity.

* Deep focus setting: The method of focusing a camera on subjects at all distances by increasing the depth of field using a wide-angle lens. With GR DIGITAL II, it can be set in snapshot mode.


Sample photo: Door-1.JPG
Taken with: GR DIGITAL II ●1/400 sec ●F5.0 ●ISO100 ●EV-0.3 ●WB:AUTO
Sample photo: Door-3.JPG
Taken with: GR DIGITAL II ●1/160 sec ●F3.5 ●ISO100 ●EV-0.3 ●WB:AUTO
Sample photo: Door-2.JPG
Taken with: GR DIGITAL II ●1/400 sec ●F4.5 ●ISO100 ●EV-0.3 ●WB:AUTO
Sample photo: A.JPG
Taken with: GR DIGITAL II ●1/250 sec ●F4.5 ●ISO100 ●EV-0.3 ●WB:AUTO
When I turned an intersection, I saw a couple walking hand in hand. Instantly, I released the shutter while holding the camera in vertical position. However, the resulting picture did not capture the "chummy" atmosphere I saw when I first saw them.
Sample photo: B.JPG
Taken with: GR DIGITAL II ●1/250 sec ●F4.0 ●ISO100 ●EV-0.3 ●WB:AUTO
While walking, pressing the "snapshot" function button, which I set in advance, and releasing the shutter button at waist height using the no finder shot technique , I was able to frame the subject in the way I intended.
Sample photo: C.JPG
Taken with: GR DIGITAL II ●1/320 sec ●F5.0 ●ISO100 ●EV-0.3 ●WB:AUTO
Further, I went close to a position where I was able to see that they were holding hands, and took one last shot. The "snapshot" mode combined with the no finder setting no finder shot setting is the supreme snapshot setting for street photos.
Sample photo: D.JPG
Taken with: GR DIGITAL II ●1/640 sec ●F7.1 ●ISO100 ●EV-0.3 ●WB:AUTO
When I was walking on a crossover bridge, I saw a woman intently putting make-up on her face holding a compact in her hand. I pressed the function button immediately to switch to "snapshot" mode, and shot a picture using the no finder shot technique.
Sample photo: E.JPG
Taken with: GR DIGITAL II ●1/640 sec ●F7.1 ●ISO100 ●EV-0.3 ●WB:AUTO
In the first shot, it was difficult to see the compact with the naked eye, so I went closer and photographed using the no finder shot technique. "Snapshot" mode with the focus distance fixed provides a quick shutter response. This can be a vital setting for street shots.
Sample photo: F.JPG
Taken with: GR DIGITAL II ●1/160 sec ●F3.5 ●ISO100 ●EV-0.3 ●WB:AUTO
The valley between buildings among busy streets is astonishingly quiet and a strangely comfortable place. I could use the LCD monitor or the view finder, however, in this case I daringly photographed it to create the sense of walking motion using the no finder shot technique.
Sample photo: G.JPG
Taken with: GR DIGITAL II ●1/80 sec ●F2.4 ●ISO100 ●EV-0.3 ●WB:AUTO
In addition, I kept on shooting while I was walking, holding the camera at the height of a door knob, and photographed in "snapshot" mode using the no finder shot technique. By shooting like this, I was able to capture the subtle relationship between the light and shadow, and the sense of tranquility in the city.

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